Bugsby’s Hole – some background

Bugsby’s Hole – Some articles about the area and its originals

NOTE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS HAVE COMMENTS FROM A MR. BUGBY WHO MAY, AT LAST, HAVE FOUND WHO BUGSBY WAS

 

roundelWas there a pre-18th century building at Bugsby’s Hole?   – note by Mary Mills

Other Bugsby’s holes – note by Mary Mills

Letter from Pat O’Driscoll – please see very important comment on this posting by Dale Bugby

Who was Bugsby (cutting  from PLA Journal by Mr Green) please see very important comment on this posting by Dale Bugby

The Importance of Being Bugsby. Muriel Searle. Port of London. January 1975. (not reproduced, no copyright permission)

Bugsby is Bugby

Bugsby’s Hole. letter to the press  – Kentish Mercury 1923 An altered roadway – newspaper cutting – some recollections – Kentish Mercury 1932 Also see http://onthethames.net/2014/02/14/platform-defence-bugsbys-reach/ Return to Riverway

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1 thought on “Bugsby’s Hole – some background”

  1. If someone can send me an email address I think I can make pretty good case for Captains John, William and Timothy Bugby being the namesake. I have links to early government records with “Bugby or Bugby’s Hole referenced in documents, prior to the 1800s. Bugby Hole was a deep anchorage capable of weathering a storm. John Bugby was a wealthy successful captain in the mid 1600s. No name was on that part of river prior to his time that I can find. The anchorage explains why the family would use the strange name “Bugby Hole” in three different locations for their slave plantations. The marsh would have been vacant in the 1600s. Bugby Reach, the stretch of the river, or Bugby Marsh as the early maps show makes sense because of the anchorage. Bugby wasn’t the landowner, which made searching old records frustrating. Bugby was a family name back as far as 1400, searching for Bugsby would be fruitless. A map maker simply mispronounced and mis-spelled it by the 1800s. The early maps and records in the 1600 and 1700s had it right. Naming the anchorage after a ship captain, makes perfect sense.

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